In a study of baboons.

Aging cells help make old bodies Brown University biologists have uncovered intriguing evidence to aid the theory that older cells help to make old bodies. In a study of baboons, scientists showed that as these animals age, the amount of aging cells in their skin increases significantly. As time passes, cells lose their capability to divide, a state known as replicative senescence. The brand new research, published within an advanced online edition of Science, is the 1st to quantify the current presence of replicatively senescent cells in virtually any species.

Safety Assessments Of the 109 individuals, 21 had grade 3 or 4 4 neutropenia through the first 6 weeks of open-label valganciclovir therapy. From week 6 through month 6, a complete of 10 of the 47 participants who received the active drug had grade 3 or 4 4 neutropenia, in comparison with 13 of 49 who received placebo . A complete of 3 individuals had the medication temporarily suspended because of an absolute neutrophil count of less than 500 per cubic millimeter. All treatment interruptions occurred within the initial 6 weeks of the study, and treatment was resumed after resolution of the neutropenia. The alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels increased slightly at months 4 and 5 in the group of participants who received the active medication, although the differences between this group and the group that received placebo were not statistically significant or clinically significant .Safety Assessments Of the 109 individuals, 21 had grade 3 or 4 4 neutropenia through the first 6 weeks of open-label valganciclovir therapy. From week 6 through month 6, a complete of 10 of the 47 participants who received the active drug had grade 3 or 4 4 neutropenia, in comparison with 13 of 49 who received placebo . A complete of 3 individuals had the medication temporarily suspended because of an absolute neutrophil count of less than 500 per cubic millimeter. All treatment interruptions occurred within the initial 6 weeks of the study, and treatment was resumed after resolution of the neutropenia. The alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels increased slightly at months 4 and 5 in the group of participants who received the active medication, although the differences between this group and the group that received placebo were not statistically significant or clinically significant .